Planting a Hardy Water Lily

Planting container:  Find a large pot with a large horizontal surface area for the lily to grow.  Hardy water lily has a traveling root and thus requires ample space to grow to a healthy size.  Although many other containers can be used, we recommend a container with a twenty-inch long growing area and seven inches of growing depth (see picture to the left).

 

 

 

 

Filter Tray 2Place fertilizer on the bottom of your non-perforated planting container.  Distribute the fertilizer evenly across bottom of the container.   Then place plain garden soil (dirt with no organics or amendments) over the fertilizer placed on the bottom.  Slightly moisten and pack soil.

 

 

 

 

Filter Tray 1Place lily root in corner/at side of your planting container so that future lily growth is towards the center.   Bury root being careful not to cover the crown of the lily (the growing end of lily where leaves and buds are coming out).  Gently pack the soil around the root and place small stone or brick on top of root to ensure that it stays planted (again being careful not to damage or bury the growing crown of the lily).  Plant anacharis grass around lily container (poking bundled end of grass a couple inches into the soil) gently packing soil to hold down bunch.  Moisten and pack soil.  Then top with a thin layer of sand and gravel.

* Replant your lily once every year. We sell the tray pictured with soil and fertilizer complete for $28.75.
* Please call The Pond Company at (626) 284-5937 if you have any questions.

Koi Photo!

We found this site today that features photos of Koi Fish. You really owe it to yourself to see it for yourself! Check out Muza-chan’s Gate to Japan! We hope you enjoy it as much as we do!

In Memory of Mr. Ed Fujimoto

Pondways is sad to learn about the passing of Mr Ed Fujimoto. He was a great contributor to our Koi Community. To learn more about him please read this article.

Millions of Dead Fish

Millions of Dead Fish that died due to natural causes in Redondo Beach. The fish apparently lacked oxygen. Too many fish in one tight space was a reciepe for disaster. Take care of your fish population in your pond!

 

 

24th Annual KCSD Koi Show

Don’t forget to visit the 24th Annual KCSD Koi Show will be Feb 18-20, 2011 at the Activity Center of the Del Mar Fairgrounds. Look for me and Barbara Johnson at the show! Be sure to say “Hey Jon Rasmussen and Fishy Lady!”

Read more about the Koi Show in San Diego and Koi USA!

FEEDING FISH

Feed fish what they want – observe them,“listen” to the fish. They will let you know whether they are hungry or not. 15-20 minutes after placing the food in the water for the fish to eat, there should be no floating food left. If there is food, you have fed them too much.

Fish are cold-blooded animals. Their metabolism is based on the temperature of the water they live in. Warmer water creates faster metabolisms. Fish will eat more and need more food to survive. Colder water creates slower metabolisms in fish. They will eat less food. In fact, at 50 F / 30 C you stop feeding goldfish and koi. Below 50 F / 30 C if they do swallow food, the food will spoil before it passes out of their long intestinal track. This leads to all types of problems – sickness, diseases, digestive problems, etc. Note that normally they will not eat when it is this cold and the uneaten food will only spoil, clog and over load your filter system, disturb the pond balance and possibly create an unhealthy and detrimental situation. Thus note at
50 F / 30 C and below – DO NOT FEED YOUR FISH!
Start feeding once a day as the temperature warms in the spring. When it warms, koi can be fed multiple times a day. As the weather cools in the fall, gradually slow down on the quantity till you stop at 50 F.

Koi/Carp are bottom-feeding fish in nature. The barbs on either side of their mouths are used to tactilely feel along the bottom of a lake for food. They are omnivores. Naturally, their diet would consist of worms, crustaceans, plant life, etc. We have trained koi to come to the surface with floating food – for our own enjoyment.

Koi food companies are doing their best to create dietary mixtures in their foods and for the most part they are doing a good job.  And yet there is still a belief that the dietary needs of koi are still most optimally met by augmenting a variety of foods – some proteins, plants, starch, etc. This can include not just pelleted/processed foods, but also fruit – sliced oranges, grapefruit, watermelon – grains -rice, wheat, bread.

“Going Green”

“Help my pond is green!” is the distress call I often hear from clients. No doubt, this type of cloudy green water caused by algae can be very unsightly.
It is perfectly normal for any body of water to turn green at the start. Algae are quick to take hold of “new” water in its exposure to the natural elements. Possibly seeded even by spores in the air, it is usually the first to be “planted.” A very basic, microscopic plant and fast spreading, algae thrive in this environment without any real competition. It can be a rapid growing arena packed with fresh nutrients that are “up for grabs” and algae will grab hold of this opportunity.  In fact, it is actually a good thing that algae is there to immediately take care of all the stuff that will quickly accumulate to toxic levels or even amass at a rapid rate to become a rotten, smelly, even deadly mess. It acts as a natural buffer. In quick natural course, the algae takes hold of waste products, such as fish waste, and converts them into growth. As it thrives, the water will probably turn green from its growth and proliferation. Not to worry, this is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact this is Mother Nature’s way of not having the water sour. It is just that we don’t think of “pea soup” as attractive. Thus we turn to other “green” ways of keeping our pond nice… such as Biological Filtration or other aquatic plants such as Anacharis.

Indeed going green, we see nature teaches us that there are certain formulas and quantifications we can abide by for the proper establishment of this delicate balance. And to achieve such, we must have patience. Even when a pond is set up with these proper proportions it is normal for the pond to get cloudy and turn green with algae. This is only for a temporary period of time and if the right set up of the pond is done it will naturally turn itself around. The biological filter needs to “seed” and get up to speed. Or in the case of relying on plantings to balance, the plants must get up and growing. Many factors come into play but there is a normal schedule that Mother Nature tends to follow. Expect for the pond to turn green a few weeks from the initial filling. Then the clearing will normally happen 6 to 8 weeks from the start if not before. Cold weather normally lengthens this cycle of events and warm weather may accelerate it. If too many fish are introduced at the start, this too may lengthen the time and make it harder to reach a balance.

In a pool of water with just fish, algae will have a “boom” of growth on all of the “nutrients” put into that water by the fish. Yes fish are little “fertilizer factories” (or big dependant on their size or numbers). Algae are a plant at its very basic level. Now the natural process or eco-system that Mother Nature has put in place very basically goes like this; fish eat and put out “fertilizer,” plants in-turn take in that “fertilizer” to grow, fish subsequently feed on that plant growth and again put out “fertilizer”, …thus the cycle goes on. This cycle, sometimes called the nitrogen cycle, or circle of life, is the eco-system that naturally takes place and will take place with or with out us doing anything. Once this cycle becomes self-supporting we call it “balanced.” And a green body of water is not necessarily bad, in fact it may be healthier than that of a clear body of water that could be toxic in quality! But a green pond is unsightly and therefore not what we desire.  Green water, algae, will just happen if nothing else is done to help this process. So what can we do to help this process and achieve clear water?

The Answer: Anacharis or biological filtration

“Going Green”

“Help my pond is green!” is the distress call I often hear from clients. No doubt, this type of cloudy green water caused by algae can be very unsightly.

It is perfectly normal for any body of water to turn green at the start. Algae are quick to take hold of “new” water in its exposure to the natural elements. Possibly seeded even by spores in the air, it is usually the first to be “planted.” A very basic, microscopic plant and fast spreading, algae thrive in this environment without any real competition. It can be a rapid growing arena packed with fresh nutrients that are “up for grabs” and algae will grab hold of this opportunity. In fact, it is actually a good thing that algae is there to immediately take care of all the stuff that will quickly accumulate to toxic levels or even amass at a rapid rate to become a rotten, smelly, even deadly mess. It acts as a natural buffer. In quick natural course, the algae takes hold of waste products, such as fish waste, and converts them into growth. As it thrives, the water will probably turn green from its growth and proliferation. Not to worry, this is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact this is Mother Nature’s way of not having the water sour. It is just that we don’t think of “pea soup” as attractive. Thus we turn to other “green” ways of keeping our pond nice… such as Biological Filtration or other aquatic plants such as Anacharis.

Indeed going green, we see nature teaches us that there are certain formulas and quantifications we can abide by for the proper establishment of this delicate balance. And to achieve such, we must have patience. Even when a pond is set up with these proper proportions it is normal for the pond to get cloudy and turn green with algae. This is only for a temporary period of time and if the right set up of the pond is done it will naturally turn itself around. The biological filter needs to “seed” and get up to speed. Or in the case of relying on plantings to balance, the plants must get up and growing. Many factors come into play but there is a normal schedule that Mother Nature tends to follow. Expect for the pond to turn green a few weeks from the initial filling. Then the clearing will normally happen 6 to 8 weeks from the start if not before. Cold weather normally lengthens this cycle of events and warm weather may accelerate it. If too many fish are introduced at the start, this too may lengthen the time and make it harder to reach a balance.

In a pool of water with just fish, algae will have a “boom” of growth on all of the “nutrients” put into that water by the fish. Yes fish are little “fertilizer factories” (or big dependant on their size or numbers). Algae are a plant at its very basic level. Now the natural process or eco-system that Mother Nature has put in place very basically goes like this; fish eat and put out “fertilizer,” plants in-turn take in that “fertilizer” to grow, fish subsequently feed on that plant growth and again put out “fertilizer”, …thus the cycle goes on. This cycle, sometimes called the nitrogen cycle, or circle of life, is the eco-system that naturally takes place and will take place with or with out us doing anything. Once this cycle becomes self-supporting we call it “balanced.” And a green body of water is not necessarily bad, in fact it may be healthier than that of a clear body of water that could be toxic in quality! But a green pond is unsightly and therefore not what we desire. Green water, algae, will just happen if nothing else is done to help this process. So what can we do to help this process and achieve clear water?

The Answer: Anacharis or biological filtration

Keating Residence

West Los Angeles Residence

Pond Home